Why the NHS Needs to Welcome Innovation or Face Collapse

Recently-departed Head of Monitor, David Bennett, has stated that the National Health Service cannot survive as a purely taxpayer-funded service and must look for other forms of revenue if it is to meet future demand.

In a continued effort to close the staggering NHS funding gap, a further £2 billion was injected into the service just last year, but the problems and deficit remain, with Bennett claiming that the gulf between demand and resources was actually closer to double this figure at the time. Now, he has warned Jeremy Hunt that without a further cash injection this year the NHS’s struggle to meet specific targets such as waiting time reduction would continue – “something’s got to give,” he said.

doctor holding a piggy bank

 

Something certainly does have to give, and with a recent damning assessment of Britain’s health service claiming that it is one of the worst in the world for developed countries, any further setbacks could see the NHS stand on the brink of collapse. This month’s spending round will see chief executive of the NHS Simon Stevens and Hunt attempt to secure a substantial downpayment on an extra £8 billion-a-year promised to the NHS over the next five years.

We’ve reached the stage, though, where simply throwing money at the NHS will not help to alleviate its difficulties – and taxpayers will certainly not be thrilled about having to cough up extra funds to pay for a failing service. The NHS needs to be revolutionised, not refinanced – and telehealth solutions such as Now GP are ideally placed to help the NHS avoid collapse in the coming years through integration and collaboration.


“Telehealth solutions such as Now GP are ideally placed to help the NHS avoid collapse in the coming years through integration and collaboration.”


With the ultimate aim of providing the general public with a more accessible and reliable solution to their primary healthcare needs, Now GP’s state-of-the-art remote video consultation and medicine delivery platform is already making waves in the world of UK healthcare. If integrated into the National Health Service, this will ease pressure on Britain’s healthcare in a number of ways.

Waiting times has long been one of the major flaws in the UK health system. 14 million of us now face a wait of a week or more to see a doctor – and this number continues to grow and grow. Through Now GP, patients can get to see a doctor when they need to at the touch of a button, reducing appointment waiting times and at the same time relieving pressure on our country’s A&E departments. Healthcare chiefs have recently claimed that in some areas of the UK, as much as 80% of A&E visits are unnecessary, with people urged to find alternative methods of finding a cure for their primary care concerns – this alternative is here already, and it’s called Now GP.

The innovative Now GP mobile app for iOS

 

Lack of job satisfaction amongst GPs and those in the healthcare industry has been documented regularly in recent months, with many doctors feeling that the pressures and difficulties associated with working for the NHS are no longer allowing them to enjoy their work. Now GP is aiming to give doctor’s the freedom to choose when and where they want to work, helping to rejuvenate the careers of hundreds of healthcare professionals who feel short-staffed, under-supplied and overworked thanks to the NHS’s overstretched service.

To meet the challenges it faces head on, the NHS needs to react and adapt to change, or else the quality of care that patients receive will fall. Getting better health value for patients of course means improving productivity – but improving productivity doesn’t mean dedicated doctors, nurses and managers working even longer and harder. It means everyone working together, embracing the amazing innovation we have at our fingertips and working in a different, more rewarding and smarter way.

 

 


Will NHS Cuts Jeopardise Patient Care?

NHS trusts around the United Kingdom have been ordered to draw up emergency plans due to the severe financial challenges that are facing the National Health Service, which have been described as “almost unprecedented.”

As a result of the growing financial crisis facing the NHS, trusts have been told to only “ensure vacancies are filled only where essential,” with nurses warning that such NHS cuts could potentially jeopardie patient care and hospital safety.

The orders have been issues by David Bennett, the Chief Executive of Monitor, the regulatory body of NHS England. He said on Monday:

“As you know, the NHS is facing an almost unprecedented financial challenge this year. Current plans are quite simply unaffordable.

“As I have said before, if we are to do the best we can for patients we must leave no stone unturned in our collective efforts to make the money we have go as far as possible.

“We are already reviewing and challenging the plans of the 46 foundation trusts with the biggest deficits. However, it is clear that this process will not close the funding gap and so all need all providers – even those planning a surplus this year – to look again at their plans to see what more can be done.”

The Royal College of Nursing has since expressed fears that decisions could damage patient care and have a negative impact on safety. Roger Goss, from Patient Concern, suggested that fewer staff will mean longer waits for patients, claiming that “longer waits for treatment will inevitably worsen patients’ suffering.”

As the NHS continues to face unrelenting pressure, it once again emphasises the benefits of telehealth platforms such as Now GP and how we can help to ease the pressure on the health service. By providing patients with convenient healthcare from the comfort of their own home, office or when they’re on the move, Now GP is not a replacement for the NHS – however, we offer patients an effective solution to help cope with the growing demands on the National Health Service.

Get in touch with us today to find out more.